2021 marks the 100th anniversary of the Remembrance Poppy in Canada

OTTAWA, ON, 6 July 2021 – One hundred years today, the precursor to The Royal Canadian Legion officially recognized the Poppy as Canada’s lasting symbol of Remembrance. A century later, the Legion is commemorating this historic milestone.

“We are proud to be the safekeepers of this special symbol, brought to us by a visionary woman,” says Dominion President Thomas D. Irvine, CD. “Every time I see a Poppy I think of our fallen, and I thank them for their sacrifices.”

The idea for the Remembrance Poppy in Canada was conceived by Madame Anna Guérin of France. She was inspired by John McCrae’s poem “In Flanders Fields.” Anna had originally founded a charity to help rebuild regions of France torn apart by the First World War, and created poppies made of fabric to raise funds.

Later, Anna presented her concept to France’s allies, including the precursor to The Royal Canadian Legion, The Great War Veterans Association. The idea was considered at a meeting in Port Arthur, Ontario (now Thunder Bay) and was adopted on July 6, 1921.

The Legion’s “Poppy 100” tributes this year include:

  • The offering of commemorative Poppy pins that replicate the original 1921 lapel pin.
  • The release of an inspiring video that explains the history of the Poppy as Canada’s symbol of Remembrance.
  • The creation of a unique commemorative stamp by Canada Post slated for release this fall.
  • The creation of a unique commemorative coin by The Royal Canadian Mint for release this year.
  • The special lighting of several Canadian landmarks to mark the anniversary on July 6, 2021 including BC Place, the Vancouver Convention Centre and Olympic Cauldron, the West Edmonton Mall, the Calgary Tower, the Regina City Hall foyer, Niagara Falls, the CN Tower, the City of Toronto downtown sign, and the Champlain Bridge.
  • A commemorative program led by Legion representatives in Port Arthur, ON (now Thunder Bay), where the Poppy symbol was officially adopted in 1921.

Visit Legion.ca to learn more about the history of the Poppy